Café CIC 2017: The chemistry of cheese

THIS WILL FILL UP QUICKLY (only 96 spots available) – RSVP TO gelminil@macewan.ca (invite friends and family)

A wait list will be in effect.

Café CIC
Cheeses of the World: – Une soirée à la fromagerie
Cheese tastings throughout the evening

Students $10, CIC members $15, non-members $20 (includes a glass of wine)

Enjoy an evening of cheese and chemistry with
Speaker Dr. Paul Jelen, professor of Food Science & Dairy Technology, U of A

Where: Concordia University
When: March 15th – Cocktails at 6:00pm, the event from 6:30pm to 9:00pm includes:

A chance to find out how and why so many cheese varieties can be made from one single raw material
– milk, nature’s most perfect food. The principles of conversion of milk to curd will be briefly illustrated, and the most
important aspects of the manufacturing and especially ripening phases will be discussed. Emphasis of cheese tasting
will be on illustrating the contrasting tastes and textures of various cheese varieties, with as much emphasis on
Canadian cheeses as possible. The sequence will be from the mildest (young cheddar)through more and more
“culture – ripened” cheeses (Gouda, Havarti), to “adjunct-ripening” (Emmentaler), to”stretching and lipase effect”
(Cacciocavallo, Mozzarella), to bacterial surface ripening (Oka or Limburger), to mold ripening (Camembert type,
Stilton type, combination) and finishing with very old (3 to 4 year) cheddar.

Florence Williams: Unusual observations in nitrene chemistry

February 21 at 7:00 pm we will be hosting Professor Florence Williams of the University of Alberta Department of Chemistry for a talk on her nitrene chemistry research. All are welcome to attend the talk. If you’re curious to learn more about Prof. Florence Williams, check out her website: https://www.ualberta.ca/science/about-us/contact-us/faculty-directory/florence-williams

Location: E3-25 Gunning/Lemieux Chemistry Centre, University of Alberta

Date: Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Time: 6:30 pm (refreshments provided)

Title: “Unusual Observations in Nitrene Chemistry”

Abstract:

Nitrenes are high-energy intermediates that enable challenging transformations such as C-H insertion, de-aromatization and rearrangement processes. Yet, nitrenes often exhibit poor chemoselectivity profiles. As a result, nitrene or nitrenoid-mediated processes typically employ stabilizing groups, such as carbonyl and sulfonyl substituents, or transition metals, in order to promote one desired reaction pathway. In the Williams lab, we are exploring boron and phosphorus(III) as stabilizing agents which can electronically alter the behavior of nitrenes. Our studies have resulted in an unusual synthesis of anilines arising from borylnitrene C-H insertion reactions. Experiments show complete selectively for aryl C-H bonds, with no reaction at the expected benzylic position. Further, the identity of the boron ligands is intrinsically connected to a chemoselectivity switch in the reaction.

February Lecture: Prof. Sarah A Styler on Dusty Skies and Dirty Buildings

February 24 at 6:00 pm we will be hosting Professor Sarah A Styler of the University of Alberta Department of Chemistry for a talk on her atmospheric chemistry research. All are welcome to attend the talk. If you’re curious to learn more about Prof. Sarah A Styler, check out her website: https://uofa.ualberta.ca/chemistry/faculty-and-staff/people/sarah-styler

Location: E3-25 Gunning/Lemieux Chemistry Centre, University of Alberta

Date: Tuesday, 24 February 2016

Time: 6:00 pm (refreshments provided)

Title: “Dusty Skies and Dirty Buildings: Adventures in Atmospheric Photochemistry”

Abstract:

Over a billion tons of photoactive dust are released into the atmosphere every year from deserts and other arid environments. After emission, this dust undergoes transport to distant urban regions, where it can mix with local pollution sources and settle on building surfaces, which are themselves potential substrates for photochemistry. Although studies have shown that reactions on environmental surfaces can influence the lifetime of surface-sorbed pollutants and the atmospheric abundance of reactive trace gases, our understanding of photochemistry on dust and urban surfaces is far from complete. In this seminar, I will outline our group’s approach to studying these complex systems, and highlight some of our recent discoveries.

Professional Development Event for Chemical Professionals

January 21 at 19:00 pm we will be hosting a Professional Development Event for Chemical Professionals at the University of Alberta

Format of event:
19:00 – Networking mixer
19:30 – Short presentations on relevant career topics by 4 panelists
(Rina Carlini, Conrad Siegers, Ken Schmidt, and Fiona Hess)
20:30 – Q & A session

Location: Papachase Room, Faculty Club, University of Alberta, map)

Date: Thursday, 21 January 2016

Time: 19:00 pm (1 free drink + appertisers provided)

RSVP: at eventbrite website, $10.00

November Speaker: Rylan Lundgren

November 3 at 6:00 pm we will be hosting Professor Rylan Lundgren of the University of Alberta Department of Chemistry for a talk on his catalysis research. All are welcome to attend the talk. If you’re curious to learn more about Dr. Lundgren’s research, check out his website: http://lundgren.chem.ualberta.ca/rylan

Location: E3-25 Gunning/Lemieux Chemistry Centre, University of Alberta

Date: Tuesday, 03 November 2015

Time: 6:00 pm (refreshments provided)

Title: “New Metal-Mediated Cross-Coupling Reactions: Making Great Reactions Even Better”

Abstract:

Cross-coupling reactions promoted by transition metals are among the most commonly used synthetic transformations by chemists in virtually all subdisciplines. The various flavors of Pd-catalyzed arylation reactions have revolutionized how functional molecules are prepared, even to the point of the fragments derived from these reactions being overexpressed in active pharmaceutical ingredients. The development of Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions received the Nobel Prize in 2010, but there remain many challenges to be addressed and new coupling manifolds to be discovered. This seminar will discuss some of the most pressing challenges and highlight some solutions that we have uncovered.